This website requires Javascript to function properly.
If you are using a screen reader or other auxiliary aid and are having problems using this website, please send us a message through our Contact Us form or call 866-632-6819.

As we continue to navigate these uncertain times, please visit our hours of operation regularly
for branch updates, as things can change unexpectedly.


See All | Contract

Online Banking

JUne 16, 2021 - AMAZON PHONE SCAM

Phishing schemes and cyber attacks are reaching scary levels of sophistication. Most recently a ruse involving fraudulent Amazon phone calls has become widespread. Members have reported receiving a phone call from someone posing as Amazon customer service. The fraudulent call informs the member of recent issues on their accounts, such as suspicious Amazon charges or outstanding account balances. The member is then instructed to provide financial details such as bank account information and credit card numbers as well as remote access to their computer in order to resolve the alleged account issues.

How to spot the "Amazon Scam":

  • Be skeptical of unsolicited calls. Some departments at Amazon will call customers, but Amazon will never ask you to disclose or verify sensitive personal information or offer you a refund you do not expect.
  • Amazon will never ask you to make a payment outside of their website and will never ask you for remote access to your device.
  • Amazon will never send you an unsolicited message that asks you to provide sensitive personal information.
  • Any customer who receives a questionable email or call from a person impersonating an Amazon employee should report them to Amazon customer service immediately.

For more information on the Amazon Phone Scam read more at Michigan.gov.


February 5, 2021 - AG Nessel, UIA Alert Residents to Tax Form for Victims of Identity Theft in Unemployment Claims

Michigan Attorney General Dana Nessel and the Michigan Unemployment Insurance Agency are letting individuals know of important tax documents for people who may be victims of identity theft as a result of widespread fraudulent unemployment claims in 2020.  Read more.

November 19, 2020 - Watch out for holiday fraud and scams

As the holidays approach, merchants are preparing for a continued increase in online sales as a result of store closures and restrictions due to the COVID19 pandemic. Members should be aware of scams that target the convenience of online shopping such as fake or spoofed websites and pop-ups, eskimming, porch pirates, or impersonations for your curbside pickups. As you put together lists of gifts and purchases for the upcoming holidays, it can be easy to let your guard down. Make sure you are aware of the latest fraud and scams targeting shoppers during this holiday season. Click Here to learn more!


August 28, 2020 - “Are you human?” New Attack Uses a CAPTCHA as Camouflage

Have you ever found yourself staring at a wobbly letter trying to decide if it is an X or a Y, just to prove to a website that you’re not a robot? This funny little test is called a CAPTCHA and it is used to help prevent automated malicious software, known as “bots”, from accessing sensitive information. Unfortunately, cybercriminals are now using CAPTCHAs as a way to make their phishing scams seem more legitimate.

In a recent Netflix-themed attack, scammers are sending a phishing email that claims "your payment did not go through and your account will be suspended in the next 24 hours". To resolve the issue, you're instructed to click on a link in the email to update your information. If you click the link, you’re taken to a CAPTCHA page. Once you pass the CAPTCHA, you’re redirected to an unrelated webpage that looks like a Netflix login page. Here you’re asked to enter your username and password, your billing address, and your credit card information. Don’t be fooled! Anything entered here is sent directly to the cybercriminals.

Remember these tips:

Phishing emails are often designed to create a sense of urgency. In this case, “your account will be suspended in the next 24 hours”! Think before you click, the bad guys rely on impulsive clicks.

When an email asks you to log in to an account or online service, log in to your account through your browser and not by clicking the link in the email. That way, you can ensure you’re logging into the real website and not a phony look-alike.

Remember, anyone can create a CAPTCHA webpage, so don't fall for this false sense of security.

Stop, Look, and Think. Don't be fooled.


July 20, 2020 - What you need to know about romance scams

Millions of people turn to online dating apps or social networking sites to meet someone. But instead of finding romance, many find a scammer trying to trick them into sending money. Click here to read about the stories romance scammers make up and learn the #1 tip for avoiding a romance scam.


June 15, 2020 - Exploiting the Coronavirus: Supermarket Spoofs

Grocery delivery services have been quite popular during the COVID-19 pandemic. These services help support social distancing, reduce the number of shoppers in each store, and allow at-risk patrons to safely buy essential items. Unfortunately, the popularity of these delivery services has caught the attention of cybercriminals. The bad guys are now spoofing supermarkets that offer delivery services in hopes of stealing your personal information. It starts with a phishing email that urges you to log in to your supermarket’s website using the link provided. Clicking the link takes you to a fake login page for your local supermarket. The page asks you to select your email provider (Gmail, Apple, and so on) and then log in to connect your account. Don’t be fooled! Connecting your account actually delivers your email credentials to the bad guys.

Remember the following tips:

  • Never click on a link within an email that you weren’t expecting.
  • Remember that email addresses can be spoofed. Even if the email appears to be from a familiar organization, it could be a phishing attempt.
  • When an email asks you to log in to an account or online service, log in to your account through your browser-not by clicking the link in the email. That way, you can ensure you’re logging into the real website and not a phony look-alike.

April 8, 2020 - Say no to Scams

PLEASE SHARE THIS INFORMATION WITH FRIENDS AND FAMILY!!!

It's so easy to become a victim. It can happen so fast. Before you know it, you've clicked "send" and you’re out hundreds or even thousands of dollars.

Scam artists are working full-time at ripping you off. And after one scam bites the dust, the scam artists are ready with another one. It's no wonder so many people fall prey, scam artists make it very easy and they are so convincing.

There's no typical fraud victim. Even some of our members have fallen prey to these scams! Scammers don't care who you are, how old you are, or how much you earn. They're just after your hard-earned money.

Here are some tips so you don’t become a victim:

  • Spot imposters. Scammers often pretend to be someone you trust, like a government official, a family member, a charity, or a company you do business with. Don’t send money or give out personal information in response to an unexpected request — whether it comes as a text, a phone call, or an email.
  • Don’t believe your caller ID. Technology makes it easy for scammers to fake caller ID information, so the name and number you see aren’t always real. If someone calls asking for money or personal information, hang up. If you think the caller might be telling the truth, call back to a number you know is genuine.
  • Don’t pay upfront for a promise. Someone might ask you to pay in advance for things like debt relief, credit and loan offers mortgage assistance, or a job. They might even say you’ve won a prize, but first, you have to pay taxes or fees. If you do, they will probably take the money and disappear.
  • Talk to someone. Before you give up your money or personal information, talk to someone you trust. Con artists want you to make decisions in a hurry. They might even threaten you. Slow down, check out the story, do an online search, consult an expert — or just tell a friend.
  • Don’t deposit a check and wire money back. If a check you deposit turns out to be a fake, you’re responsible for repaying the bank.
  • Hang up on robocalls. If you answer the phone and hear a recorded sales pitch, hang up! These calls are illegal, and often the products are bogus. Don’t press 1 to speak to a person or to be taken off the list. That could lead to more calls.

Soo Co-op Credit Union will NEVER ask for your personal or financial information via email or text message or by phone. But many scam artists will! We recommend that you approach all unsolicited e-mail, phone calls, and text messages with a degree of suspicion.