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Fraud Alerts & Scams

Current Alerts

In addition to the helpful tips posted on this site to educate and protect members against scams and fraudulent activities, SCCU will also periodically add special alerts and warnings regarding current scams.

If you are unsure about any type of request for financial information, please contact SCCU directly to confirm the validity of the message before sending money or releasing any information.


Recent Warnings and Alerts Include:

December 15, 2021 - Amazon Scam

Be on the alert because there's a new Amazon scam in town. Some of our members have been receiving calls from Amazon customer service telling them that they have a fraudulent charge on their account. Be aware this is a SCAM!

Scammers call with an automated message, pretending to be Amazon customer service. They tell you that there was a fraudulent charge on your account, then they tell you they can help you fix it. "The con artists will either outright ask for credit card and account login details. Or, they will request remote access to your computer under the guise of “helping” to solve the issue for a fee. Please remember that it is illegal for a company to charge a fee to investigate credit or debit card fraud.

Please hang up when you receive this kind of call. Log into your Amazon account online and check your purchase history. If anything is out of the ordinary contact Amazon directly and monitor your SCCU account online through Online Banking and or Mobile Banking.

Please help Soo Co-op Credit Union to get this information out to our community. Please SHARE!!!


December 3, 2021 - Order Confirmation imitation 

If you’ve started your holiday shopping, you may have received purchase confirmation emails from Amazon, one of the world’s most popular retailers. Unfortunately, cybercriminals have also been sending their own version of these emails. In a new scam, cybercriminals impersonate Amazon to send fake purchase confirmation emails in hopes of receiving a special holiday gift: your credit card information.

In this scam, cybercriminals send you a fake purchase confirmation email that appears to come from Amazon. In the email, you can review details about the phony purchase, such as the payment amount and your mailing address. To review the purchase further, you can click a “View or manage order” button in the email. If you click this button, you’ll be taken to Amazon’s real website, but you won’t be able to find information about the purchase. As a last resort, you can call the customer service phone number in the email. If you call, you’ll be asked to provide your credit card number and CVV number to cancel the purchase. Instead of canceling the purchase, you’ll grant cybercriminals access to your credit card.

Don’t fall for this scam! Follow the tips below to stay safe:

  • Watch out for fake customer service phone numbers. If you need assistance, check the vendor’s website to find their customer service phone number or email address.
  • Don’t click links in emails you weren’t expecting. If you click a malicious link, malware or other malicious software may be downloaded onto your device.

Don’t share sensitive information, such as credit card numbers or social security numbers, over the phone.


November 12, 2021 - Phishing starts earlier and earlier 

It’s only early November, but you have probably already seen Christmas trees sold in stores. This is a trend known as “seasonal creep” in which retailers start selling seasonal items in advance of the actual season. Did you know that cybercriminals also follow this trend?

For example, Black Friday and Cyber Monday traditionally fell after Thanksgiving in the United States. However, these international shopping events now start as early as November 1. Cybercriminals take advantage of this trend by sending phishing emails disguised as advertisements and phony purchase receipts long before the holiday season begins.

Follow the tips below to shop safely this holiday season:

  • Never click a link from an email or text message that you weren't expecting, even if the link appears to be for a store you recognize. Instead, use your browser to navigate directly to the retailer’s official website.
  • Watch out for malvertising. Malvertising is when cyber criminals try to phish shoppers through ads on social media and other websites. Always think before you click!
  • Be cautious of advertisements that promise outrageous deals. Remember that if something seems too good to be true, it probably is!

November 5, 2021 - Real People in fake call centers

The newest trend in cybercrime is the use of cybercriminal-controlled call centers to trick you into providing your bank or credit card information. Cybercriminals try to use real people in fake call centers to convince you that a scam is legitimate.

A recent call center scam starts with an email that appears to be an invoice for a very large purchase. It is not clear what company this invoice is from or what was purchased, but the payment amount is listed six times. The email also starts and ends with a line directing you to call their number if you did not authorize the transaction. If you call the number provided, a representative happily offers to refund you. But first, they’ll need your bank or credit card information. Unfortunately, the representative is actually a cybercriminal who plans to use your payment information for their own devious purposes.

Follow these tips to stay safe from this social engineering attack:

  • The invoice in this attack is specifically designed to cause alarm and frustration. Cybercriminals target your emotions in hopes of tricking you into acting impulsively. Always think before you click.
  • A valid phone number doesn’t mean that an email is legitimate. Cybercriminals are real people who can lie over the phone, just as they lie in phishing emails.

Instead of calling the provided number, reach out to your bank or credit card company to verify the details of the transaction. If by chance there has been unauthorized usage, your bank or credit card company can help correct the issue.


October 21, 2021 - Beware of Medicare Open Enrollment Scams

The open enrollment period for changing Medicare Advantage and Part D prescription plans ends December 7. While Medicare-related fraud is a year-round concern, Medicare recipients should be especially alert for fraudsters during the open enrollment, when scammers use the increased public attention about Medicare choices as an opportunity to strike. Take precautions to avoid becoming a victim of identity theft or Medicare fraud by guarding your Medicare number — and other personal information. Shop and compare plans to ensure you are getting the plan that best meets your needs, and don’t fall for high-pressure sales pitches.

Tips to avoid scams:

  • Never give your Medicare number or other personal information to an unexpected caller or someone who makes an unsolicited request for it.
  • Be suspicious of anyone who calls and claims to be able to help you sign up for coverage but needs to confirm your Medicare number, or asks for your Medicare number just to provide you enrollment information.
  • If a caller says they’re from Medicare and asks for your Medicare number or other personal information, hang up. The Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services will never call to ask for or check Medicare numbers.
  • Don’t trust caller ID. Scammers use technology to hide their real numbers and instead show numbers that seem legitimate. If the caller ID shows a 202-area code or says “government,” it could be anyone calling from anywhere.
  • Don’t respond to a telemarketing call relating to Medicare. Hang up on robocalls or other telemarketing calls pitching insurance plans.
  • Anyone who tries to sell you Medicare insurance while claiming to be an “official Medicare agent” is a scammer. There are no Medicare representatives. If someone comes to your door claiming to be from Medicare, remember Medicare does not send representatives to your home.
  • Ignore anyone who calls saying you must join their prescription plan or you will lose your Medicare coverage. The Medicare prescription drug plan (also known as Part D) is completely voluntary.
  • Be alert for mailers that appear to be government communications but are actually advertisements for private companies. These mailers will sometimes have a disclaimer, but it is buried in small print. Read carefully!

If you need help with Medicare, call 800-MEDICARE or visit the Medicare website.

Michigan consumers can also call 800-803-7174 for the Michigan Medicare/Medicaid Assistance Program if you suspect a potential scam or need help making a health benefits decision.


October 8, 2021 - Remain Vigilant to Ongoing Cybersecurity Threats

Malicious online activity continues to intensify by the day, and it is becoming increasingly important for each of us to remain vigilant. One such example is spear phishing. 

What is spear phishing?

This is a more targeted phishing attack towards a specific individual, organization, or business. Malicious actors may target your members by sending emails that appear to come from your credit union and they will often include links that would direct members to websites that are built to look very similar to yours.

It’s important to remind both employees and members that this type of phishing is occurring. Similar to how your members could fall for something that appears to be from your institution, your employees could fall victim to this as well. It is important to remind your staff to analyze communications appearing to come from organizations that you work closely with.

Here are a few tips:

  • Verify the sender’s email address: Look at the email address that each email comes from. Does part of the address look suspicious? Does the domain match with whom the sender claims to be associated?
  • Check links in emails: Use your mouse to hover over links in emails. Does it look correct? Or does something seem off?
  • Think before you click: Take your time when analyzing the email.

When in doubt call: If you ever have any concerns or questions about the legitimacy of an email you received, contact the organization right away. Even if the suspicious activity is in the form of a phone call and they ask you for your credentials, we recommend that you tell them that you will call them back. Additionally, be sure to call the number you have on file, not the number they provide to you.


September 17, 2021 - Phony LinkedIn Job Postings

It was recently discovered that job postings on LinkedIn aren’t as secure as you might expect. Anyone with a LinkedIn profile can anonymously create a job posting for nearly any small or medium-sized organization. The person creating the post does not have to prove whether or not they are associated with that organization. This means that a cybercriminal could post a job opening for a legitimate organization and then link applicants to a malicious website.

Worse still, cybercriminals could use LinkedIn’s “Easy Apply” option. This option allows applicants to send a resume to the email address associated with the job posting without leaving the LinkedIn platform. Since the email address is associated with the job posting and not necessarily the organization, cybercriminals can trick you into sending your resume directly to them. Resumes typically include both personal and professional information that you do not want to share with a cybercriminal.

Follow the tips below to stay safe from this unique threat:

  • Watch out for grammatical errors, unusual language, and style inconsistencies in LinkedIn job postings. Be suspicious of job postings that look different compared to other job postings from the same organization.
  • Avoid applying for a job within the LinkedIn platform. Instead, go to the organization’s official website to find their careers page or contact information.

If you find a suspicious job posting on LinkedIn, report it. To report a job posting, go to the Job Details page, click the more icon, and then click Report this job.


JUne 16, 2021 - AMAZON PHONE SCAM

Phishing schemes and cyber attacks are reaching scary levels of sophistication. Most recently a ruse involving fraudulent Amazon phone calls has become widespread. Members have reported receiving a phone call from someone posing as Amazon customer service. The fraudulent call informs the member of recent issues on their accounts, such as suspicious Amazon charges or outstanding account balances. The member is then instructed to provide financial details such as bank account information and credit card numbers as well as remote access to their computer in order to resolve the alleged account issues.

How to spot the "Amazon Scam":

  • Be skeptical of unsolicited calls. Some departments at Amazon will call customers, but Amazon will never ask you to disclose or verify sensitive personal information or offer you a refund you do not expect.
  • Amazon will never ask you to make a payment outside of their website and will never ask you for remote access to your device.
  • Amazon will never send you an unsolicited message that asks you to provide sensitive personal information.
  • Any customer who receives a questionable email or calls from a person impersonating an Amazon employee should report them to Amazon customer service immediately.

For more information on the Amazon Phone Scam read more at Michigan.gov.


February 5, 2021 - AG Nessel, UIA Alert Residents to Tax Form for Victims of Identity Theft in Unemployment Claims

Michigan Attorney General Dana Nessel and the Michigan Unemployment Insurance Agency are letting individuals know of important tax documents for people who may be victims of identity theft as a result of widespread fraudulent unemployment claims in 2020.  Read more.


November 19, 2020 - Watch out for holiday fraud and scams

As the holidays approach, merchants are preparing for a continued increase in online sales as a result of store closures and restrictions due to the COVID19 pandemic. Members should be aware of scams that target the convenience of online shopping such as fake or spoofed websites and pop-ups, skimming, porch pirates, or impersonations for your curbside pickups. As you put together lists of gifts and purchases for the upcoming holidays, it can be easy to let your guard down. Make sure you are aware of the latest fraud and scams targeting shoppers during this holiday season. Click Here to learn more!


August 28, 2020 - “Are you human?” New Attack Uses a CAPTCHA as Camouflage

Have you ever found yourself staring at a wobbly letter trying to decide if it is an X or a Y, just to prove to a website that you’re not a robot? This funny little test is called a CAPTCHA and it is used to help prevent automated malicious software, known as “bots”, from accessing sensitive information. Unfortunately, cybercriminals are now using CAPTCHAs as a way to make their phishing scams seem more legitimate.

In a recent Netflix-themed attack, scammers are sending a phishing email that claims "your payment did not go through and your account will be suspended in the next 24 hours". To resolve the issue, you're instructed to click on a link in the email to update your information. If you click the link, you’re taken to a CAPTCHA page. Once you pass the CAPTCHA, you’re redirected to an unrelated webpage that looks like a Netflix login page. Here you’re asked to enter your username and password, your billing address, and your credit card information. Don’t be fooled! Anything entered here is sent directly to the cybercriminals.

Remember these tips:

• Phishing emails are often designed to create a sense of urgency. In this case, “your account will be suspended in the next 24 hours”! Think before you click, the bad guys rely on impulsive clicks.

• When an email asks you to log in to an account or online service, log in to your account through your browser and not by clicking the link in the email. That way, you can ensure you’re logging into the real website and not a phony look-alike.

• Remember, anyone can create a CAPTCHA webpage, so don't fall for this false sense of security.

Stop, Look, and Think. Don't be fooled.


July 20, 2020 - What you need to know about romance scams

Millions of people turn to online dating apps or social networking sites to meet someone. But instead of finding romance, many find a scammer trying to trick them into sending money. Click here to read about the stories romance scammers makeup and learn the #1 tip for avoiding a romance scam.


June 15, 2020 - Exploiting the Coronavirus: Supermarket Spoofs

Grocery delivery services have been quite popular during the COVID-19 pandemic. These services help support social distancing, reduce the number of shoppers in each store, and allow at-risk patrons to safely buy essential items. Unfortunately, the popularity of these delivery services has caught the attention of cybercriminals. The bad guys are now spoofing supermarkets that offer delivery services in hopes of stealing your personal information. It starts with a phishing email that urges you to log in to your supermarket’s website using the link provided. Clicking the link takes you to a fake login page for your local supermarket. The page asks you to select your email provider (Gmail, Apple, and so on) and then log in to connect your account. Don’t be fooled! Connecting your account actually delivers your email credentials to the bad guys.

Remember the following tips:

  • Never click on a link within an email that you weren’t expecting.
  • Remember that email addresses can be spoofed. Even if the email appears to be from a familiar organization, it could be a phishing attempt.
  • When an email asks you to log in to an account or online service, log in to your account through your browser-not by clicking the link in the email. That way, you can ensure you’re logging into the real website and not a phony look-alike.

April 8, 2020 - Say no to Scams

PLEASE SHARE THIS INFORMATION WITH FRIENDS AND FAMILY!!!

It's so easy to become a victim. It can happen so fast. Before you know it, you've clicked "send" and you’re out hundreds or even thousands of dollars.

Scam artists are working full-time at ripping you off. And after one scam bites the dust, the scam artists are ready with another one. It's no wonder so many people fall prey, scam artists make it very easy and they are so convincing.

There's no typical fraud victim. Even some of our members have fallen prey to these scams! Scammers don't care who you are, how old you are, or how much you earn. They're just after your hard-earned money.

Here are some tips so you don’t become a victim:

  • Spot imposters. Scammers often pretend to be someone you trust, like a government official, a family member, a charity, or a company you do business with. Don’t send money or give out personal information in response to an unexpected request — whether it comes as a text, a phone call, or an email.
  • Don’t believe your caller ID. Technology makes it easy for scammers to fake caller ID information, so the name and number you see aren’t always real. If someone calls asking for money or personal information, hang up. If you think the caller might be telling the truth, call back to a number you know is genuine.
  • Don’t pay upfront for a promise. Someone might ask you to pay in advance for things like debt relief, credit and loan offers mortgage assistance or a job. They might even say you’ve won a prize, but first, you have to pay taxes or fees. If you do, they will probably take the money and disappear.
  • Talk to someone. Before you give up your money or personal information, talk to someone you trust. Con artists want you to make decisions in a hurry. They might even threaten you. Slow down, check out the story, do an online search, consult an expert — or just tell a friend.
  • Don’t deposit a check and wire money back. If a check you deposit turns out to be a fake, you’re responsible for repaying the bank.
  • Hang up on robocalls. If you answer the phone and hear a recorded sales pitch, hang up! These calls are illegal, and often the products are bogus. Don’t press 1 to speak to a person or to be taken off the list. That could lead to more calls.

Soo Co-op Credit Union will NEVER ask for your personal or financial information via email or text message or phone. But many scam artists will! We recommend that you approach all unsolicited e-mail, phone calls, and text messages with a degree of suspicion